Tag Archives: social movements

ISA47 at 2016 Forum: 18 panels on social movements

3rd ISA Forum of Sociology

July, 10-14 2016, Vienna Austria

ISA-RC 47“Social classes and social movements”

Abstract proposals should be sent to the panel coordinators and submitted before September 30th 2015 on the ISA Forum website (http://www.isa-sociology.org/forum-2016)

Joint Sessions

Opening session of RC 47 & RC 48: Contemporary Social Movements

Session Organizer(s):

Tova BENSKI, President of RC 48, tovabenski@gmail.com

Geoffrey PLEYERS, President of RC 47, Université de Louvain, Geoffrey.Pleyers@uclouvain.be

Benjamín TEJERINA, Universidad del País Vasco, Spain, b.tejerina@ehu.eus
Breno BRINGEL, Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil,
brenobringel@iesp.uerj.br

We live in a time of deep reconfigurations of democracy, social movements and activism. Five years after the start of a major global movements’ wave in 2011, the panorama for social movements and democracy in the 2010s is a contrasting one. How do new trends in social movements study help us to grasp this fast evolving situation and the changing forms and meanings of both social movements and democracy?
The decade started with a spread of emancipatory movements and democratic openings. After a phase of intense mobilizations, some of these activists have developed democratic and emancipatory practices in their daily life, while others experiment a partial shift to the institutional politics arena. By the mid-2010s, the panorama for social movements and democracy looks however far more contrasting. The democratic project has however come under serious threat. Social movements are repressed, journalists are killed, and citizens are spied by their states. Even in democratic regions, citizens seem to have little impact on major economic and political decisions. At the same time, conservative, racist and far-right movements are gaining impetus in the West and in the East, jihadism attracts thousands of young people from different regions of the world.
What have been the impacts, the challenges and the limits of emancipatory and conservative movements in the 2010s? How do the new trends in social movement studies help us to grasp these transformations and the challenges faced by social movements and democracy?

 

Democracy in the Squares: Global Resistance Movements and Women

Joint session RC47 / RC48 [host committee]

Session Organizer(s)
Nilufer GOLE, École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), nilufer.gole@ehess.fr
Buket TURKMEN, Galatasaray University, Turkey,
elizemestan@gmail.com

A new wave of protest movements has emerged everywhere in the world, ranging from the Middle East, to the European cities, as well as Brazil and Ukraine. These movements follow transnational dynamics, while the domain of politics remain at the national scale. Citizens of the world elaborate new democratic imaginaries. A new public culture of contestation appears with art becoming its intrinsic dimension. These movements that we want to examine contribute to the enactment of forms of citizenship in the public square redefining the political subject. Especially female activists’ struggles in the global resistance movements reveal the emergence of new subjectivities through the act of resistance.
While sociologists believe in the existence of a rupture between these newly emerging struggles and the heritage of the past social struggles, there are also remarkable continuities. The rupture women activists in the Tahrir Square created with patriarchy can only be understood with reference to Egyptian feminism. While Kurdish, Turkish, nationalist, leftist and Islamist female activists developed a sense of sisterhood during the Gezi movement in Istanbul, this sisterhood has been developing since the 1990s, along with the evolution of Turkey’s feminisms. Women in resistance movements experience a dual suffering and have to challenge both the authoritarian/neoliberal regimes and the patriarchy that pervaded the movement along with the society. We will try to understand the new subjectivities constructed by female activists of these global resistance movements as a mixed consequence of the experience of resistance and the feminist heritage.

 

Silos or Synergies? Can Labor Build Effective Alliances with Other Global Social Movements?

Joint session RC47 & RC44 Labor Movements [host committee]

Session Organizer(s)

Peter B. EVANS, University of California-Berkeley, USA, pevans@berkeley.edu

Daniele DI NUNZIO, Associazione Bruno Trentin/IRES/ISF, Italy, d.dinunzio@ires.it

On the defensive in the face of an increasingly aggressive global capital, labor needs allies. Operating in a “silo” – that is within carefully defined organizational and strategic boundaries that insulate worker organizations from other sorts of mobilization – is a formula for defeat. Alliances with communities and movements for democracy have always been crucial to labor’s success at the local and national levels. Alliances with other transnational social movements at the global have been more sporadic, usually limited to specific campaigns. 

Where are the most promising opportunities for building cross-issue synergies that enhance labor’s political clout along with that of other social movements? What are the obstacles to building synergistic relationships? Few would question the contributions of movements for human rights to the quest for expanding workers rights. There is already a rich literature looking at labor’s relationships with movements prioritizing gender issues and with environmental movements. But much work needs to be done before we understand why sometimes silo approaches prevail and what conditions create possibilities for synergies. What are the complementarities between labors’ organizational and ideological strengths and those of other movements? What are the strategic contradictions that make synergies elusive? 

This session seeks to bring together both work based on the analysis of specific successes and failures at building cross-movement alliances and work that seeks to offer a general analytical understanding of the foundations of synergies and silos.

 

The Sociology of Social Movements as a General Sociology. Around Alain Touraine

Joint session RC47 & RC48 [host committee]

Session Organizer(s)
Benjamín TEJERINA, Universidad del País Vasco, Spain, b.tejerina@ehu.eus
Kevin MCDONALD, Middlesex Univesity, United Kingdom, k.mcdonald@mdx.ac.uk
Tova BENSKI, President of RC 48, tovabenski@gmail.com

Geoffrey PLEYERS, President of RC 47, Université de Louvain, Geoffrey.Pleyers@uclouvain.be

Alain Touraine has underlined the importance of considering the sociology of social movements not as a specialized subfield but as an essential part of general sociology. This session will gather contributions that have developed this perspective in different ways and studying a range of social movements on different continents.

 

Social Movements and the Future They Want

Joint session of RC07 Futures Research [host committee] and RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements

Session Organizer(s)

Markus S. Shulz, ISA Vice-president, markus.s.schulz@gmail.com

Geoffrey PLEYERS, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium, Geoffrey.Pleyers@uclouvain.be

Social movement scholars can make a significant contribution to the third Forum of the ISA entitled “The Futures we Want: Global Sociology and the Struggles for a Better World”. Social movements are major actors of our societies and contribute to shaping possible futures.

This session welcomes both concrete analysis and theoretical contributions on how progressive or conservative social movements imagine, shape and implement alternative futures. We notably welcome contributions on how social actors and social movements imagine and contribute to shape alternative lifestyles, policies and sociability in the global age, increasingly shaped by both global interdependency and the finitude of the planet.

 

Young Activists, Subjectivity and “the Future They Want”

Joint session RC34 Sociology of Youth and RC47 [host committee]

Session Organizer

Carmen LECCARDI, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy, carmen.leccardi@unimib.it

This session welcomes contributions on how young activists imagine, shape and implement alternative futures. As framed in the third ISA Forum presentation, “Tomorrow no longer appears as pre-determined by inevitable trends but as a rather contingent outcome of complex, typically multi-scalar dynamics that vary in their intensity of contentiousness.” Young people aspire, desire, envision, expect, fear, imagine, plan, project, reject, sustain, and wage war over futures. Young activists are major actors of our societies in shaping our possible futures.

We notably welcome contributions on young activists’ perspectives on the future and how these perspectives shape their subjectivity and their personality. Young green activists and their visions of a future on a limited planet prove particularly insightful in that perspective.

However, to understand the specific potential of their vision – at the centre of which stand autonomy, self-determination, experimentation and creativity together with a high level of personal responsibility – the widespread representation of the future expressed by contemporary young people has to be considered. For the majority of them, the future is related above all with indeterminateness and uncertainty. Moreover, the imperative of choice is not flanked by their conviction that personal decisions will be effectively able to condition future biographical outcomes as well as collective environment.

 

ISA47 Sessions in alphabetical order

Cultural Signification: Making Sense of Action in Social Movements

Session Organizers:

Dai NOMIYA, Chuo University, Japan, dainom@tamacc.chuo-u.ac.jp,

James JASPER, City University of New York, JJasper@gc.cuny.edu,

Antimo Farro, University of Rome, Italy, antimoluigi.farro@uniroma1.it,

Benjamin TEJERINA, Universidad del País Vasco, Spain, b.tejerina@ehu.eus

For many years, researchers have found that social movements contain cultural and psychological elements that guide actions in one way or another, leading eventually to movement mobilization.  Cultural attributes, such as interpretation, emotion, collective identity, and frame, as they give meanings and signification to the action, work in participants’ engagement in the action. 

While long recognized as indispensable for mobilization, these cultural components have also been regarded as the elements difficult to grasp; they are difficult to detect, observe, conceptualize, and generalize.  We have come a long way to find frame and collective identity to work in a concrete movement setting.  But we have to stop and think what else we have acquired as our common cultural languages. We know that emotions are important.  But we are not sure if we have developed and conceptualized enough to bring emotion in our thought frame as a sound analytical concept.  We are not sure further if these cultural languages can easily travel across researchers residing different continents, East and West and North and South.  We may also have different methods and methodologies to detect and observe cultural components of action.   

This proposed session aims at bringing together our cultural findings in social movement research.  Proposing a new concept, new ways of doing research aiming at digging out cultural materials, rearranging current conceptualization, displaying a region/location-specific research method, etc, should help understand where we are, and which direction(s) we should move on from here.

 

Environmental Movements in the Age of Climate Change

Session Organizer(s)
Christopher ROOTES, University of Kent, United Kingdom,
c.a.rootes@kent.ac.uk

Environmental movements and protest appeared to be natural bed-fellows as activists struggled to mobilise an environmentally uneducated populace and to challenge the priorities of governments and parties more concerned about economic development than environmental protection. That changed as governments began to acknowledge environmental problems and, recognising the expertise of environmental NGOs, began to see NGOs as partners rather than adversaries. That relationship was consolidated as climate change rose on political agendas, as governments saw NGOs as potential mobilisers of citizens toward sustainable alternatives to the carbon-intensive economy. This created opportunities for NGOs, but, demanding more of them than they can deliver, it has created dilemmas about their identity and future action. Their dilemmas differ according to the dispositions of governments, from the EU, where governments have mostly accepted the need for action on climate change, to countries where governments have resisted action (e.g. Australia, USA, Canada). This panel will compare experiences at local, regional, national and transnational levels, to illuminate the variety of scenarios and responses of environmental movements and NGOs, and to consider the future of environmentalism in light of these developments. We shall be particularly interested in the development of new forms of environmental activism at local as well as international levels, and the emergence of activism on climate justice, including networks of NGOs, activists and experts in and around climate summits. Papers on transnational movements or multi-sited research in an international/global perspective will be especially welcome.

 

Far Right Movements and Social Research

Session Organizer(s)
Emanuele TOSCANO, University Guglielmo Marconi, Italy, emanuele.toscano@uniroma1.it
Chikako MORI, Hitotsubashi University, Japan,
c.mori@r.hit-u.ac.jp

The rise and spread of far right, populist and nationalist movements in Europe and elsewhere in the world opened a new framework of interest for social movement studies. The study of far right is mainly addressed by political science, focusing on parties and electoral trends. Very few researches are instead leaded from the point of view of social movement studies. One explanation can be linked with the methodological issues: social movements researchers usually use qualitative techniques, such us participant observation, in-depth interviews and sociological interventions to study social movements, often creating a relation with activists based on mutual respect and common perspectives. But how can this possible with activists whose discourses are often racist oriented, or whose initiatives are violent and disrespectful?
Which methodological obstacles arise for research oriented towards analysing protest participation in far right movements? And how do we overcome them?
The panel welcomes empirical and theoretical contributions that deal with reflection on methodology in the study of movements – such as racist, populist of far right organisations – with whose discourses and practises is difficult to empathise.
Regular Session

 

From Indymedia to #Occupywallstreet and Anti-Austerity Protests in Europe: Three Generations of Digital Activism Logics

Session Organizer(s)
Tod WOLFSON, Rutgers University, USA, wolfsont@gmail.com
Emiliano TRERÉ, Autonomous University of Queretaro, Mexico, etrere@gmail.com
Peter FUNKE, University of South Florida, USA, pnfunke@usf.edu
Paolo GERBAUDO, King`s College London, United Kingdom, paolo.gerbaudo@kcl.ac.uk

Across the last few decades the logic of activism, and of digital activism in particular, have changed dramatically. We have experienced what could be regarded as three waves of protests from the early 1990s to the present. Each of these waves is connected both by the transformations in global capitalism and the rise of the digital age, while still displaying differences or rather developments in movement-based organizing. Together however, we can conceive these three waves as part of one broader epoch of contention. Those particular waves of contention are: Global Social Justice, Occupy/Arab Spring, Syriza/Podemos.
In this panel, we propose to look at the logics of these waves of protest (or generations of digital activism) in order to explore their similarities and differences. The goal of the panel discussion would be to mine history assuming a diachronic perspective, but more concretely to understand the strengths and weaknesses of this epoch of contention as we watch the current wave of struggle unfold.
Some of the questions that will be tackled in the panel are: how have capitalist transformations informed the emergence of the current epoch of contention and how has the activists relation to communication technologies evolved and shaped the logics of protests and mobilizations? Can we conceive of an underlying meta-logics of movement politics informing the waves of protests and how are they best conceptualized, similar as well as differently enacted? What has been the evolution of the role of alternative media in an oversaturated media environment where corporate social media are increasingly dominating the digital activism scenario? What are the challenges that social movements and their communication face when they crystallize into political parties? What lessons have we learned from the analysis of this epoch of contention and what are the future horizons of digital activism and protest?

 

ICTs in the Media Ecology of Protest Movements: Infrastructures, Discourses and Practices for Social Change.

Session Organizer(s): Alice MATTONI, European University Institute, Italy, alice.mattoni@eui.eu
Ionel SAVA, University of Bucharest, Romania,
insava@sas.unibuc.ro

Studies on ICTs and social movements flourished in the past few years, also due to the relevant role that social media platforms and mobile communication devices had in the 2011 protest wave. Literature on the topic, however, frequently considers ICTs independently from the context in which they are embedded resulting in a myopic look at the role of digital media in mobilizations. This flaw might be overcome through an analysis that takes into consideration the media ecology of ICTs. Starting from this assumption, the panel seeks papers that investigate ICTs in relation to: the material infrastructures that sustain ICTs used during protests, from corporate media clouds services to activist managed hardware and software; the discourses and imageries related to ICTs, including values and beliefs that activists and other political actors attach to ICTs used during protests; the (media) practices that include the use of ICTs during protests, also in combination with other media technologies and means of communication, like the live-streaming of face-to-face assemblies or the coordinated collective use of Twitter accounts. The panel welcome papers that explore the role of ICTs in recent mobilizations through qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods approaches. We are particularly interested in papers that considers protests in Southern, Central and Eastern Europe, also in a comparative perspective with protests that occurred in other parts of the world.

 

Genesis of the New Social Movements in the Global South

Session Organizer(s)
Simin FADAEE, Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany, simin.fadaee@hu-berlin.de
Breno BRINGEL, Universidade Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,
brenobringel@iesp.uerj.br

The panel will be shaped around the so-called new social movements of the global South. The paradigm which emerged as a response to the ‘rights based’ and ‘quality-of-life’ movements (e.g. feminism, LGBT rights, environment, human rights, etc. ) in Europe and North America after the 1960s assumed that there is a clear distinction between these ‘identity’ movements  and the old organized ‘labor’ movements. Although many Southern societies have witnessed the emergence of rights based and quality-of-life movements, scholarship lacks systematic analysis of these movements in non-western context. The panel aims at addressing this gap by focusing on the historical origins, participants and the relation of these movements to earlier struggles.

 

Moving Refugees? Mobilisation and Outcomes of Refugee Movements, Solidarity Groups, and Anti-Asylum Activities

Session Organizer(s)
Ilker ATAC, ING Bank Turkey, Turkey, ilker.atac@univie.ac.at
Sieglinde ROSENBERGER, University of Vienna, Austria,
sieglinde.rosenberger@univie.ac.at

The past ten years have witnessed an upsurge of mobilizations and protest activities by asylum seekers, irregular migrants and migrant rights solidarity activists and groups. With forms of collective public action they demand advocacy for human rights, a fair asylum process and access to labor markets. Furthermore, they demonstrate resistance to pending deportations. In contrast to these pro-migrant movements, we have noticed also a rise of counter-movements that take action against asylum seekers and their accommodations, mostly on a local level.
First, the panel focuses on organizational aspects, framing strategies and identities of these protest movements. Which practices, discursive alliances and mobilization strategies do they use? What are the similarities and differences among these movements? In which ways do pro-refugee and anti-refugee movements relate to each other?
Second, the panel will deal with internal effects and social and political outcomes of these movements. These movements produce cultural effects, through their framing strategies they aim to change perceptions in the society; they produce individual/biographical effects, protests against the deportation of failed asylum seekers results in some cases to legalization. However, asylum seekers may also run the risk of being deported. Reactions of governments and other state institutions may also result in repression, co-optation, and prevention.
This panel addresses refugee, solidarity and anti-asylum movements and focuses on both their different forms of mobilizations and their social, political and movement-related outcomes. Comparative papers with regard to movements, countries and political levels as well as single case studies are also welcome.

 

Popular Dissent in Sub-Saharan Africa

Session Organizer: Marcelle DAWSON, University of Otago, New Zealand, marcelle.dawson@otago.ac.nz

The nature of popular resistance in sub-Saharan Africa has much in common with the waves of protest that have swept across the globe in recent years. Consequently, scholarship on protest in Africa – while it certainly must take into account the diversity on the continent – has much to offer the field of social movement studies. This session aims to attract a range of important voices that will examine the history, character and trajectory of grassroots struggles in sub-Saharan Africa but, at the same time, highlight the ways in which popular dissent in this region is connected to global patterns of protest. In particular, this session welcomes contributions that address, but are not limited to, the following issues:
–       Working class struggle in sub-Saharan Africa
–       Leadership and the role of key political thinkers in past and present sub-Saharan contexts.
–       ‘Dynamics of contention’  in sub-Saharan Africa both within and outside of the context of organized social movements.
–       The intersection between community and labour movements in sub-Saharan Africa.
–       Theoretical implications for social movement studies that draw on African cases.
Preference will be given to contributions that contextualize African struggles within the global picture of popular resistance.

Social Movements As Sites of Social Development

Session Organizer(s)
John KRINSKY, City College New York, USA,
jkrinsky.ccny@gmail.com

Social movements are a crucible in which activists collectively generate which new forms of social organization as they attempt to make new subjects, worlds and histories in the context of—and in response to—the old; they may equally be moments of stymied progress where few advances are made on critical questions facing movements and the social groups they represent.  Whereas recent scholarship on social movements has emphasized their microfoundations, conceived as strategic interactions and choice-points, it has tended to play down the more macro-level, longer-lasting features of capitalist societies (including their historical encoding of class, race, gender, and nationality) and the often-contradictory nature of these features. In favor of analytic formalism, social movement studies have largely abandoned systematic social criticism.  This formalist turn also tends to play down the extent to which movements are a site of collective learning.  Reticence about social critique leads analysts to abjure judgments about whether and how collective action leads toward or away from social development.  Emerging Marxist scholarship on social movements has attempted to join the focus on on-the-ground interaction typical of formalist theories with the analyses of the larger, structured dynamics of capitalism and class; and as a body of work grounded in a theory of the “self-emancipation of the working class” (variously defined), its central concern is movement development towards more encompassing modes of social action an social identities.  This panel welcomes papers that focus on efforts to weave together theories of strategy and learning and larger-scale historical and social contradictions.

 

Social Movements in Latin America: Contributing to a North-South Dialogue

Session Organizer(s)
Renata MOTTA, Free University Berlin, Germany, renata.motta@fu-berlin.de
Pablo LAPEGNA, University of Georgia, USA, pablo.lapegna@gmail.com
Ilan BIZBERG, El Colegio de México, Mexico, ilan@colmex.mx
Session in Spanish and English

Social movements from the global South are usually investigated by applying theories developed by and for the global North. But what happens when theories travel across diverse social contexts? Can theories and concepts developed in the global North fully capture the complexities of social movements and societies that have followed different historical trajectories? For instance, nationalism, “populism,” and socialism, or key institutions like the state or labor unions cannot be assumed to have universal importance and meaning. To what degree theories and practices from the global South inform social movements and studies developed in the global North? How do situated cultures and meaning-making practices require a re-elaboration of social movement theories and concepts?
We would welcome papers that establish a dialogue between theories and movements from the global South and the global North, with a special focus on Latin America. Papers may contribute to this collective enterprise in various ways, for instance, looking at (1) the social and organizational basis of activism and collective identities; (2) how different cultural and historical contexts require new ways of thinking about contentious repertoires, “frames” and the mobilization of resources; (3) the links between social movements, governments, and institutional politics (e.g. the relevance of “patronage politics” in Latin America); and (4) the convergences, influences, and tensions between the global North and global South (e.g. the influence of the Bolivian process of social change in the actions and ideas of Podemos in Spain).

 

Social Movements in the Arab World

Session Organizer(s):

Maha ABDELRAHMAN, University of Cambridge, Egypt, mma49@cam.ac.uk

The approaching fifth anniversary of the Arab Uprisings which started in Tunisia and spread like wild fire across many countries of the region is a sober reminder of the challenges faced by social movements. The demand for ‘Bread, Freedom and Social Justice’ was able to mobilise millions of people who came out to the streets to protest against a political and economic order based on policies of dispossession and exclusion. This order has long sustained its hegemony through means of political repression and inflated security apparatuses at the national level. A wide range of movements created new types of activism and mobilisation strategies from workers to students to small farmers, slum residents, professionals, the unemployed and the retired. They crossed regional, gender, class and often ideological divides. The panel aims to explore the trajectories of these movements and how they have unfolded in the aftermath of their peak in 2011. It also hopes to locate them within a comparative perspective with social movements with similar features and histories across the world. We especially welcome papers that explore how these movements have evolved, disappeared, were coopted/ integrated into the political process or completely repressed after 2011. We also encourage papers which examine mainstream theoretical tools in studying social movements in light of the experience of these movements. Comparative research which examines social movements in the Arab region with similar movements in other parts of the world including countries of both the global North and South are also highly welcomed.

 

Social Movements, Sociology and Climate Change

Session Organizer(s): Jackie SMITH, Pittsburg University, USA, jgsmith@pitt.edu
Esin ILERI, École Hautes Études Sciences Sociales, France, esinileri@gmail.com

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has stated that we need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to near zero by 2050 to avoid more devastating climate change scenarios than are already underway. As government negotiations continue to fail to generate meaningful action in this regard, social movements have been developing concrete projects to enact practices that move in the direction of a low-carbon society.
This panel welcomes contributions on two main axes. • Analyses and case studies about grassroots social movements who promote worldviews, behaviors and policies more compatible with the reality and constraints of the limited nature of the planet and about how these studies provide us with empirical data for grasping some features of the global age and its consequences on life, democracy and society. How do they imagine, implement and contribute to shape alternative futures, starting in daily life and personal experience or contesting actual policies.
• Can our work as sociologists and with social movements help us find ways to achieve a seemingly impossible goal of radical social transformation? What lessons can be learned from these movements? What movements are or should be happening among academic professionals to both reduce our own carbon footprint while also helping advance the movements responding to the climate crisis? 

 

What’s Left of 2011? Continuities and Outcomes of the 2011 Protests

Session Organizer(s)
Lorenzo ZAMPONI, European University Institute, Italy, lorenzo.zamponi@eui.eu
Priska DAPHI, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Germany,
p.daphi@gmx.de

Though large protests often surprise observers, they hardly start from scratch. Mostly, they are rooted in previous mobilisations. And often they produce outcomes that in turn will influence future mobilisation. The panel explores continuities and outcomes of social movements in the context of the wave of protests for social justice starting in 2011 – including the Arab Spring, the European anti-austerity mobilisations and the Occupy movement. This perspective allows looking at protests not as isolated events, but as part of a historical trajectory, considering both antecedents and legacies. How did previous mobilisations affect this wave of protest? How did the 2011 wave of protests influence more recent mobilisations? What are the consequences of the 2011 protests for politics more generally?
This panel hence will focus on movement continuities and outcomes, before and after the 2011 protests. On the one hand, we are interested in the contents of continuities and the role organisations, submerged networks, abeyance structures, free spaces and other actors and mechanisms play in ensuring this continuity. On the other hand, we aim to shed light on outcomes both with respect to policy-making and political representation as well as the effects on activists’ life-courses and movements’ internal organization.

peripheralizing europe

an east/south encounter of translocal politics and practices

30th july – 2nd august 2015, Lithuania

Peripheralizing Europe is a meeting of activists/researchers/cultural workers connected to the European peripheries, taking place from july 30- august 2nd 2015 near Kaunas/Lithuania. We will be gathering from across the Eastern and Southern peripheries of the continent, to share knowledges, tell of experiences and map out the current situations at the margins of this continent in crisis.

Peripheralizing Europe sets out to re-consider the European crisis from the viewpoint of the margins, understanding that the periphery is a crucial space not just for the reproduction of the centre but also a key site for the articulation of struggles and counterhegemonic practices. We will thus re-map various peripheral regions and struggles, talking about our ways of positioning, prioritizing and organizing – in order to enable new translations and compositions across them. The aim of this encounter is to enable us to get to know singular experiences as well as shared dilemmas and to develop common notions across them, in order to build networks of knowledge sharing and mutual support.

We will be working across a variety of formats and themes in this encounter, ranging from micropolitical to geopolitical issues, and from drifts and workshops to panel debates. Across Thursday 30th july (evening) to Sunday 1st August (afternoon), we will discuss: movements and politics in Lithuania, Knowledge production across territories and contexts, Peripheries and post-soviet geo-political conflict, Migration and displacement from the peripheries, and Social movements and new electoral platforms.

https://peripheralizingeurope.wordpress.com/programme/

 

Panel “Participation and Social Movements” 10 – 12 September 2015, Università della Calabria

Participation and Social Movements
Manuela Caiani, Fabio De Nardis 

Call for panel

The section promotes panels for the study of the transformations of participation and social movements (new actors, organizations and strategies) in a phase characterized by the financial and economic crisis and the profound changes in the political and social context (Internet, the ongoing process of European integration and globalization, etc.).

For more information see:

http://www.sisp.it/convegno/2015/sezioni/123/

Summer School on methods for the study of political participation and mobilization, Florence, 14-25 September 2015

ACADEMIC PROGRAMME
The Summer School will last 10 teaching days for a total of 60 hours of didactic activities, from the 14th to the 25th of September 2015. The Summer School will cover the following topics through 2 and 4 hours teaching slots: archival research; comparative historical studies and methods; participant observation; doing fieldwork during violent conflicts; interviewing activists; discourse analysis in social movement research; frame analysis in social movement research; social network analysis, how and when in social movement research; protest event analysis; surveys in political participation and mobilization; online tools and digital methods for the study of mobilizations; visuals in the study of social movements.

KEYNOTE SPEECHES
The Summer School will include three keynote speeches on social movements and research methods. Confirmed keynote speakers are: Prof. Donatella della Porta (SNS and EUI); Prof. Verta Taylor (University of California, Santa Barbara); Prof. Michele Micheletti (TBC, Stockolm University).

LOCATION
The Summer School will take place at the Scuola Normale Superiore, in Florence, Italy.

CONTACTS
Email contact for questions and clarifications about the Summer School: pam.summerschool[AT]gmail.com

ORGANISING COMMITTEE
Director  Prof. Donatella della Porta (Scuola Normale Superiore and European University Institute);
Co-director   Dr. Alice Mattoni (European University Institute);
Academic Assistant  Lorenzo Zamponi (European University Institute)

FINANCIAL AND LOGISTIC SUPPORT
The Summer School is kindly supported by:

  • The Standing Group on Participation and Mobilization of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR);
  • Scuola Normale Superiore, Istituto di Scienze Umane in Florence;
  • Centre on Social Movement Studies (COSMOS) at the Scuola Normale Superiore and the European University Institute.

OBJECTIVES
The Summer School focuses on how to analyze present and past forms of grassroots participation activated by social movement and civil society actors at the local, regional and transnational level. More in general, it aims at disseminating knowledge on how to investigate processes and mechanisms that sustain the active citizens’ participation to and mobilization in the realm of politics.
Grassroots participation and radical democracy have been at the centre of the public and political debate from 2008 onwards, when a new wave of contention crossed the entire world: from protests in Iceland to those in the MENA region, Southern Europe, North America and Latin America. The emergence of new protest movements requires scholars to reflect on the research strategies and methodologies that are employed to study grassroots participation and radical democracy.

Although there is a considerable amount of research done on how social movements and civil society actors mobilize, specialized literature on how to actually investigate this phenomena is rare, although increasingly necessary. The Summer School addresses this gap discussing how to apply the most common methods in the social sciences to investigate political participation and mobilization.

PARTICIPANTS
The Summer School is open to 20 graduate and master students as well as early career researchers with a specialized interest in participation and mobilization in different fields of study, including political science, political sociology, political communication, and political anthropology from throughout European and beyond.

APPLICATION
Applicants must email a cover letter in which they explain how the Summer School would be beneficial for their research, a 500-word abstract of their proposed paper, and a curriculum vitae no later than 20th of April 2015: to pam.summerschool[AT]gmail.com

Applicants will be informed of the outcome by email as soon as possible. Those offered places must confirm their participation within 7 days, after which places may be offered to applicants on the reserve list.

REQUIREMENTS
Students will be required to write and submit a 7.000-8.000 words paper before the starting of the Summer School. The paper will be then presented and discussed during one of the afternoon sessions.

Students will be also required to complete the mandatory readings for morning lectures and method sessions (see below) and to actively participate in discussion during morning and afternoon sessions.

Successful participation in the Summer School will be fully accredited with 30 credits.

More information: http://www.sns.it/didattica/isus/menunews/summer/14-25september/

Chamada para dossier: “Artivismo: poéticas e performances políticas na rua e na rede”

Cardernas de Arte e Antropologia

Coordenadores: Paulo Raposo (CRIA-ISCTE/IUL) e John Dawsey (NaPedra/USP)

Deadline para envio de artigos: 31.1.2015

Mais informação: http://cadernosaa.revues.org/812#tocto1n1

New Publication: Conceptualizing Culture in Social Movement Research

Edited by Britta Baumgarten, Priska Daphi, Peter Ullrich

Culture has become a prominent concept in social movement research. It is, however, often employed in an unsystematic and limited way. This volume introduces and compares different concepts of culture in social movement research. It assesses advantages and shortcomings of existing concepts and introduces new approaches. In particular, it addresses facets of cultural theory that have hitherto been largely neglected in the literature on social movements. This includes ideas from anthropology, discourse analysis, sociology of emotions, narration, spatial theory, and others. The chapters in this volume address three relationships between social movements and culture: culture as a framework for movements, social movements’ internal culture, and culture and cultural change as a result of social movement activity. For the purpose of making concepts easily accessible, each contribution explains its approach to culture in an understandable way and illustrates it with recent cases of mobilization.

9781137385789

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/conceptualizing-culture-in-social-movement-research-britta-baumgarten/?K=9781137385789

large parts online for free: http://books.google.de/books?id=5HCoBAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=conceptualizing+culture+in+social+movement+research&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ofQ0VLCmH-a8ygPmmIDgCw&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=conceptualizing%20culture%20in%20social%20movement%20research&f=false

Discount flyer: Flyer Conceptualizing Culture in Social Movement Research

Table of Contents

1. Protest and Culture: Concepts and Approaches in Social Movement Research. An Introduction; Peter Ullrich, Priska Daphi, and Britta Baumgarten

PART I: THEORIZING CULTURE FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES BEYOND THE MAINSTREAM
2. Feeling – Thinking: Emotions as Central to Culture; James Jasper
3. ‘A Whole Way of Struggle?’: Western Marxisms, Social Movements and Culture; Laurence Cox
4. Reassessing the Culture Concept in the Analysis of Global Social Movements: An Anthropological Perspective; June Nash
PART II: CULTURE AS A FRAMEWORK FOR MOVEMENT ACTIVITY
5. Culture and Activism Across Borders; Britta Baumgarten
6. Comparing Discourse between Cultures: A Discursive Approach to Movement Knowledge; Peter Ullrich and Reiner Keller
7. Culture and Movement Strength from a Quantitative Perspective: A Partial Theory; Jochen Roose
PART III: INTERNAL MOVEMENT CULTURE
8. Movement Space: A Cultural Approach; Priska Daphi
9. Movement Culture as Habit(us): Resistance to Change in the Routinized Practices of Resistance; Cristina Flesher Fominaya
10. Memory and Culture in Social Movements; Nicole Doerr
11. Embodying Protest: Culture and Performance within Social Movements; Jeffrey Juris
PART IV: IMPACT OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS ON CULTURE
12. Moving Culture: Transnational Social Movement Organisations as Translators in a Diffusion Cycle; Olga Malets and Sabrina Zajak
13. Memory Battles over May ’68: Interpretative Struggles as Cultural Re-Play of Social Movements; Erik Neveu

Seminário mensal no CIES: Movimentos Sociais e Ação Politica

Org. Guya Accornero e Britta Baumgarten

PROGRAMA

15 de Outubro | 17h00-19h00, ISCTE-IUL, sala AA2.24
Marco Allegra (CIES-IUL), Learning from the South. Informality, Contention and Democratic Governance in Urban Settings
Discussant: Roberto Falanga (ICS-UL)

26 de Novembro | 17h00-19h00, ISCTE-IUL, sala AA2.24
Nuno Nunes (CIES-IUL), Desigualdade e ação coletiva à escala individual
Discussant: Guya Accornero (CIES-IUL)

15 de Dezembro | 09h30-19h00, ISCTE-IUL, auditório B203
Conferência The Long Sixties under Authoritarian Rules. Student Movements, Radicalization and Cultural Change at the End of Southern European Dictatorships, com Erik Neveu (Universitée de Rennes), António Firmino da Costa (CIES-IUL), Luís Trindade (Birkbeck College, London), Giulia Strippoli (FCSH-UNL), Kostis Kornetis (Center for European and Mediterranean Studies – NYU), Javier Gomez Calvo (CIES-IUL), Guya Accornero (CIES-IUL)

seminarios_MS

New Publication: ‘Mild Mannered’? Protest and Mobilisation in Portugal under Austerity, 2010–2013

by Guya Accornero & Pedro Ramos Pinto

Anti-austerity mobilisations in Southern Europe since 2010 have been widely debated in recent times. Commentators have emphasised the emergence of new political subjects such as the ‘precariat’ organised into loose, IT-connected movements. To what extent do these portrayals reflect the underlying dynamics of this protest cycle, and how do these movements interact with traditional political actors? Using Portugal as a case study, this article maps the cycle of anti-austerity contention between 2010 and 2013 to reveal a more complex picture, where traditional actors, including labour unions and left-wing political parties, emerge as key actors, facilitating and sustaining the discontinuous mobilisation of new forms of activism, while seeking to gain access to new constituencies through them.

Text online here:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01402382.2014.937587#.VCu9SBarG8A

Call for Papers From Contention to Social Change: Rethinking the Consequences of Social Movements and Cycles of Protests

Call for Papers
From Contention to Social Change: Rethinking the Consequences of Social Movements and Cycles of Protests

ESA Research Network on Social Movements – Midterm Conference
19-20 February 2015 – Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain

A considerable amount of recent research has been devoted to the effects of mobilization with the intent of specifying how social movements produce social changes of various sorts. Political outcomes – including the responsiveness of decision-makers – have been studied the most, but scholarly interest in other types of effects is also growing. Among the effects that have drawn the attention of scholars are the changed behavior of economic actors and market institutions (economic effects); opinions, beliefs and collective identities of the movements’ participants and of their audience (cultural impacts); as well as variations in the life-course of individuals who participate in movement activities (biographical consequences). Sometimes these effects are intentional and sometimes not. In fact, on occasion they are contrary to the aims of those who produce them. Still, it is clear that contentious actions – whether they take the form of small local petitions, large street demonstrations or transnational campaigns mobilized on-line – transcend the internal life of social movements and have an influence on the rest of society.

Despite the abundance of research on these themes, some aspects of the consequences of social movements are still understudied.

First, while the role of the contentiousness of protest actions or the number of mobilized activists has been well-discussed, we know relatively little about how important the content of claims is for achieving movements’ goals. Framing has been shown to play a role in shaping political outcomes in some contexts, but more research could be done in this field. For example, how does the deliberative quality of the arguments made by the movement matter for the mobilization of further (the next wave) protests or for political outcomes?

Second, how does the success or failure of the movement affect the attitudes (e.g., perceived political efficacy and responsiveness) and future mobilization of the activists? There is, in general, little known about the failures and disengagement of social movements, but the consequences of such processes should be particularly noteworthy for those interested in the development of civil society.

Third, how the growing use of on-line media in social movement mobilization affect the consequences of social movements? For instance, does it lead to less sustainable mobilisation and thereby more failures? How does the use of Twitter or Facebook affect the cultural or biographical outcomes?

The mid-term conference of the ESA Research Network on Social Movements will focus on the preceding questions and welcomes both theoretical and empirical papers that tackle these and closely related issues. Single case studies and comparative studies are equally welcome.

Proposals should include the title of the proposed paper, an abstract of up to 300 words, the author’s name and affiliation. All abstracts should be in English.

The deadline for proposals is 30 September 2014 and they should be sent to both of the organizers (see the About section of the website). Decisions will be communicated by 31 October. Participants will be asked to submit their papers no later than 19 January 2015.

From Contention to Social Change is the 2015 Midterm Conference of the Research Network on Social Movements (RN25) of the European Sociological Association (ESA).

The conference organizers and Research Network chairs are: – Eduardo Romanos, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (eromanos(at)ucm.es)
Katrin Uba, Uppsala University (katrin.uba(at)statsvet.uu.se).

The RN Midterm Conference 2015 is organized with the support of: European Sociological Association, UCM Faculty of Political Science and Sociology, and TRANSOC Institute on Social Transformations.

Seminário Luso Brasileiro Trabalho, Educação e Conflitos Sociais

02 de Julho de 2014

IHC – Sala Multiusos 2, Piso 4, ID

 

Programação

 

9h00 – Abertura.

Investigadores: Raquel Varela (IHC/UNL) e Fabiane Santana Previtali (UFU – IHC/UNL).

 9h30: Sessão Temática 1- Trabalho e Educação: A experiência recente de Portugal e Brasil

Investigadores: Fabiane Santana Previtali (UFU – IHC/UNL), Teresa Medina (IHC/UNL), Sonia Maria Rummert (UFF – IHC/UNL) e Cílson César Fagiani (PPGED/UFU – IHC/UNL).                                             

12h00: almoço


14h00: Sessão Temática 2 – Trabalho e Conflitos Sociais em Portugal e Brasil Investigadores: Sérgio Paulo Morais (IH/UFU), Raquel Varela (IHC/UNL), Joana Alcântara (IHC/UNL) e Britta Baumgarten (
CIES-ISCTE Lisboa).


16h00: Sessão Temática 3 – Trabalho, Educação e Politicas Públicas no Capitalismo Contemporâneo

Investigadores: Sara Granemann (UFRJ-IHC/UNL), Thais C. Figueiredo Rêgo (PPGED/UFU – FIPMoc) e Ana Rajado (IHC/UNL).

18h00 – Encerramento

Entrada gratuita sujeita à inscrição prévia pelo e-mail:

Fabiane.previtali@gmail.com

 

 

Localização:

                                   Instituto de História Contemporanea – IHC

Av. Berna, 26 C
1069-061 LISBOA

Tel.: (00351) 21 7908300
ext.: 545
Fax.: (00351) 21 7908308
Email: 
ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

Homepage:

www.ihc.fcsh.unl.pt

PhD program in Political and Social Sciences at the Scuola Normale Superiore, in Florence (Italy) is now open

The call for application for the new PhD program in Political and Social Sciences at the Scuola Normale Superiore, in Florence (Italy) is now open. The PhD program has a strong focus on social movements and civil society. 12 grants will be awarded to the best candidates. The call is open to candidates from all countries with the aim of recruiting an international group of PhD students. All activities will be in English.
For more information about deadlines, applications and the PhD program please see:

http://phd.sns.it>

http://phd.sns.it/en/political-science-and-sociology/

International workshop “Transnational public participation and social movement activism”

Early career scholars workshop on Ambiguities of global spread, professionalization and standardization

14-15 November 2013
Lisbon

Call for papers is open until 18th August 2013: workshop_lisbon_cfp_final

The workshop is dedicated to questions linking transnational public participation research with transnational social movement activism research and pointing to dynamics of global spread, professionalization and standardization. It aims at discovering linkages, differences and ambiguities in both research fields and invites contributions from diverse disciplines. The workshop includes a public keynote dialogue between Dr. Mikko Rask, Finnish National Consumer Research Centre (confirmed), and Prof. Marisa von Bülow, Pontificia Universidad Católica, Chile and University of Brasília, Brazil (tbc) on linkages and challenges of transnational public participation and social movement activism. It concludes with a plenary discussion on political and societal relevance and implications of public participation and social movement research with Prof. Tiago Santos Pereira, University of Coimbra (confirmed), Portugal and Prof. Frank Fischer, Rutgers University, USA and University of Kassel, Germany (confirmed).

Outline of the topic

Designs and processes of participation, deliberation and activist forms become established globally addressing various policy issues and different policy levels. Social movement activist forms such as assemblies as well as ready-made templates and techniques for public participation such as citizen juries, consensus conferences, deliberative pollings, foresights, citizen budget forums etc. become developed worldwide and spread around the globe. However, they become more established in some regions while others remain less fertile for democratic and social innovations. The public participation design knowledge travels among experts, practitioners and citizens increasingly in a transnational and translocal setting.

The climate of uncertainty and risks of modernity, requirements of good governance and strong social movements are contextual factors increasing the demand for different/new models of participation. On the one hand this leads to standardization and homogenization of approaches around the world, on the other hand it faces the diversity of intellectual, cultural and political backgrounds that influence norms and values of what is seen to be the ‘good’, the ‘right’ and the ‘efficient’ participation.

The increasing spread of public participation principles and methods brings up ambivalent dynamics and dilemmas such as

* Circulation of concepts, models and techniques:

Different concepts of democracy and representation co-exist and built a fragmented meta-discourse as references for diverse fields of participation practices, at the same time single models and techniques circulate as best-practice. The concepts, models and techniques from diverse cultural, theoretical and normative backgrounds travel transnational and entangle in new combinations, not necessarily frictionless. .

* Diversity and hybridization versus homogenization and standardization:

The spectrum of models and techniques is characterized by diversity and homogenization at the same time. New application problems or trends towards good governance, and calls for more democratization by social movements and protest groups bring new designs and techniques for participation. Existing models become modified to hybrids and single designs become dominant practices and de facto standards in the field, some of them even legally installed.

* Specialized expertise and professionalization:

Expertise for public participation models and processes becomes more and more complex and specialized. It is stored in handbooks, academic publications and is openly accessible in specialized websites. Conferences and trainings are elements in this knowledge production chain and professionals such as facilitators, moderators, policy consultants, global activists and academics built their career on it. Participation becomes a matter of ‘experts.’

The workshop approaches reflection on the transnational formation and standardization of public participation with three foci:

1) Global spread of new action forms, practices and models for public participation: How do action forms and practices travel, how are they modified and adapted, and finally how do they become established in a new context? How do transnational formation and standardization become established? How are they intermingled with the spread and the increasing diffusion and how do they shape the field of participatory innovations? It’s worth to raise questions of how norms and standards of designs and normative principles lead to automatism and establishment of potentially taken for granted approaches of public participation and challenge to look which mechanisms and forms of conformance, modifications and resistance to standards appear. Participatory Budgets, for example were practiced at a municipal level in Porto Alegre already in 1989 and from there spread worldwide. Social movement practices, e.g. the way deliberation is practiced in the assemblies of the Spanish 15M, often trace back to older social movement practices in other regions of the world. These practices are not simply copied, but constantly adapted.

2) Normalization and professionalism in expertise: How do dynamics of transnational normalization and mainstreaming of public participation models go hand in hand with professionalism of experts of public participation? What about the role of experts mediating between citizens / stakeholders and decision makers / policy makers? Can we see trends towards commercialization of public participation practices and an evolving ‘participatory industry’ of participation consultants? How does this affect the spread and the legitimacy of participatory processes? For instance development agencies, like US Aid or GIZ (former GTZ), over a long time have generated a large expertise in how to improve participation in development projects which has gain acceptance as so-called expert knowledge but partly competes or contradicts with the local knowledge and cultural scripts for problem solving.

3) The making and shaping of public participation models: How are transnational formation and standardization shaped by the social construction of public participation (models)? The knowledge production of public participation models provides a range of approaches on public participation. This includes competing alternative models for participation, controversies over authority of normative conceptions for democratic quality and efficient policy making and competing legitimacy claims of models and actors involved. The framing of ‘the public’ (the role of representation, self-selection versus random-selection), ‘the right way to talk’ (for instance based on rationality, consensus oriented) and the desired outcome of participation (activating citizenship, preventing social resistance, empowerment of marginable groups) includes implicit diverse normative conceptions of democracy and politics and shapes the reality the models are used in. This is why the look into the making of public participation models becomes crucial.

Related to these themes we are especially interested in papers that deal with empirical examples which give insights into designs or forms for participation, deliberation and social movements activism that make global claims or travel across different localities. Examples are the World Wide Views, pan-European approaches on participatory processes (European Citizen Consultation, Meeting of Minds, Europolis, etc.) or large-scale processes such as the Australian Citizens’ Parliament, recent developments of transnational and global social movements, the World Social Forum and its regional forms (the continental ones, country specific and local social forums, etc.), transfer of action forms (related to the Occupy Movement, Pussy Riot, Femen, etc.) and models of democracy from below (as for example participatory budgeting approaches, deliberative pollings, foresights), development of internal meeting cultures, and practices to overcome unequal participation due to status differences or language by these social movement actors.

Target audience:

The workshop welcomes conceptual, theoretical and empirical contributions from early career scholars (including PhD-candidates and Post-docs) addressing one or more of these foci. Contributions combining different research perspectives on participatory and deliberative policies and social movements engagement, from public policy and governance studies, interpretative policy analysis, organizational studies, urban and planning studies, innovation studies, science and technology studies, geography and anthropology are explicitly welcomed.

Publication plans:

The workshop aims at providing an appropriate spirit and format supportive in particular for ambitious early career scholars who are interested in publications. Therefore experienced scholars as discussants shall help to elaborate manuscripts towards publishable papers. Selected authors will be invited for international peer reviewed publication activities afterwards.

Submission procedure:

Extended abstracts should be no longer than 300 words, written in English and contain a clear outline of the argument, the conceptual, theoretical and/or empirical framework, methodology and results. Abstracts for empirical papers further should include a brief description of the data used. They should be sent to nina.amelung@tu-berlin.de not later than 18th of August 2013.

Special Events: Lisbon is one of Europes’ most exciting cities which we would like to introduce to the participants of the workshop with the special focus on its social movements and public participation activities. Therefore we meet for a ‘reception’ on Wednesday, October 13, the evening before the workshop starts at MOB, a cultural centre run by two activist groups the Precários Inflexíveis (“The Inflexible Precarious Workers” an association that fights on behalf of the precarious workers) and Group Hassan (a cultural initiative, offering e.g. Hip Hop courses)). Further we offer a walk through Mouraria, a revitalized district in the historical center of Lisbon which tells us a story about the ambiguities of activating residents from diverse cultures and identities for public participation.

Venue:

The workshop will take place at CESNOVA – Centre for Sociological Studies of the Universidade Nova de Lisboa – and CIES – Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology of the University Institute of Lisbon.

Time planning:

Deadline for abstracts: 18th of August 2013

Announcement selected abstracts: after 15th of September 2013

Deadline for papers: 31st of October 2013

Workshop: 14th and 15th of November 2013, reception on 13th of November, guided Lisbon tour on 16th of November

Organisation:

The Workshop is hosted in collaboration of CESNOVA at Universidade de Nova and CIES at Instituto Universitário de Lisboa. The concept is developed by Nina Amelung, Innovation in Governance Research Group at Technische Universität Berlin / CESNOVA at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and Dr. Britta Baumgarten, CIES – Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology, University Institute of Lisbon.

Management team (alphabetical order): Nina Amelung, Dr. Britta Baumgarten, Madalena Corte Real, Cristina Oliveira

Scientific committee (alphabetical order): Nina Amelung, Dr. Britta Baumgarten, Prof. Breno Bringel, Prof. António Moniz, Prof. Beatriz Padilla, Dr. Mikko Rask and N.N.

Conference fees and support for travel costs: There is no workshop fee planned. Accommodation and lunch/ dinner costs are individual costs. Unfortunately we cannot offer travel reimbursement, but help with information about funding programs.

Contact:

Nina Amelung, Innovation in Governance Research Group /CESNOVA, nina.amelung@tu-berlin.de

Britta Baumgarten, Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology, University Institute of Lisbon, britta.baumgarten@gmail.com

The workshop is supported by the German Friedrich-Ebert Stiftung.